Wednesday, November 23, 2011

State Rep. Clark Hall’s Sees No Problems With Missing Precincts


Rep. Clark Hall (D-Marvell) Edition:

“It’s enough to make you wonder if this is the kind of representation Mr. Hall would provide the First Congressional District if he becomes its congressman—one who ignores loose ends in legislation because he doesn’t see any. Or if there is one, he doesn’t want to bother fixing it.” - Arkansas Democrat-Gazette


No precinct is an island, Unless the Ledge has screwed up
Arkansas Democrat-Gazette, Editorial, Pages 12, 11/22/2011
Extract from article - LITTLE ROCK — “If you want to make an easy job seem mighty hard, just keep putting off doing it.” — Olin Miller

AN ELECTION commission in Jefferson County noticed a curious omission in the map of the state’s new congressional districts, and did what an election commission should do when it spots a problem: It reported it. As if the commissioners actually thought somebody in state government would do something about it. These people have faith.

By now the Case of the Missing Precincts has attracted the attention of the congressman from the First District, who wants to know if two precincts that should have been transferred from the Fourth District to his really were. Rick Crawford notes that Act 1242, the redistricting act, doesn’t specifically list these precincts as having been reassigned.

One of them is in little Wabbaseka, Ark., and the other lies along the border of three adjoining counties—Arkansas, Jefferson and Lonoke. Call them the lost islands of Arkansas’ new congressional map. Tiny precincts, but you can bet they’re important to the folks who live in them. Especially if they wind up in the wrong congressional district.

If these political isles have been assigned to the wrong district, it would raise a legal question about the constitutionality of the state’s new congressional districts, since the districts are supposed to be contiguous, not leave some precincts out. . . .

CLARK HALL, a state rep from Marvell who’s already announced for Rick Crawford’s congressional seat, doesn’t see any problem here. What, him worry? “The map is legal, the map is fine, the map is what we’re going to go with. End of story.”

Really? And suppose some litigious type doesn’t see it that way, and gets a judge to agree with him? Or has Representative Hall decided he’s a court, too?

End of story? This one could be only beginning. So could the expense if the state’s taxpayers have to defend this legislative map in court.

It’s enough to make you wonder if this is the kind of representation Mr. Hall would provide the First Congressional District if he becomes its congressman—one who ignores loose ends in legislation because he doesn’t see any. Or if there is one, he doesn’t want to bother fixing it. (“Nobody wants to get into that mess again, including me.”) Unfortunately, no mess is really fixed till it’s fixed right. You have to wonder why somebody would run for the Legislature if he weren’t interested in solving the state’s problems or, as in this case, anticipating and preventing them.

You would think that by now Congress has passed quite enough fuzzy legislation (see all the questions that still linger about ObamaCare) without having somebody like Clark Hall up there to tell us there’s no problem here and to move on . . .

Click here to read full editorial (Subscription Required)
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Note: Above news article shared by the Republican Party of Arkansas.

Tags: newspaper report, Arkansas Democrat Gazette, democrat, Clark Hall, redistricting, missing precincts, Election commission, Jefferson County, Arkansas, 1st Congressional District, US Representative, Rick Crawford

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